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Home  >  Next 2 Blow  >  Creeping with D'NME
Creeping with D'NME
Posted: Monday - January 28, 2013 | Comments: (0)
 

 It doesn’t take much to be influenced by the world of rap; you know the world where anybody who can rhyme or construct a catchy phrase gets radio play? Well, the world of Hip Hop requires much more…one must be fearless yet faithful to the culture, showing respect for those that have paved the way.

 

You’ll never meet an upcoming artist more equipped than D’NME.

 

D’NME is prepared to challenge your musical ear by bringing intellect back into the art of Hip Hop. There are no short cuts taken by this lyricist; he says more in a verse than some rappers say in an entire mixtape. If you want it straight with no chaser face D’NME. Outfitted with self-confidence that most would confuse as arrogance; D’NME is transparent with his gift of lyricism, no smoke and mirrors. He’s dedicated to his craft which has helped him mature into the man and artist he is today.

 

Yo! Raps steps into the land of D’NME. We learn where his very unique name came from, how rap has influenced his path and why he’s more interested in true talent than fame.

 

How did you come up with the name D’NME?

 

The name D'NME stemmed from the resistance I was receiving from various people in the earlier stages of my Hip Hop career. I always felt as if I was being written off before I even got a chance to show and prove. In addition to that, I never rapped about being a gangster, and 90% of the artists involved in Hip Hop no matter where you're from, put that "Gangster persona" in their subject matter. So I was constantly being ignored because of the way I was coming across, which was more backpack than street. So I remember being in the studio one day and saying to myself "If people want to hate me, then fuck it, I'll give them a reason to hate me. I'll be D'NME" (pronounced Dee-Enemy). Around that time I was listening to Jay-Z's "Reasonable Doubt" album, and one of my absolute favourite songs from that album is "D'Evils". So I took the "D" apostrophe and spelled "enemy" phonetically. It looked really cool on paper and what it represents in terms of origin gives it that "weight". So now, I have this attitude where if people say derogatory things about me, my response is "I'm D'NME you're not supposed to like me".

 

Explain your flow and how it grew to where it is today?

 

My flow was built on that whole multi-syllable technique. Rappers such as Kool G Rap, Big Daddy Kane, Rakim, Masta Ace, Big L, and Eminem among others, I'm cut from their cloth. I always strived to uphold a high-level of lyricism before anything else. I don't do ad-libs to fill in bars, I like to connect and bend words. I started out very complex, so when it came to rhyme schemes my flow was smooth but I was more focused on strictly rhyming and being as lyrical as possible, opposed to having deep meaning. Gradually I got into mixing multi-syllable schemes with "internal rhymes" and making certain parts of my flow mimic the drum pattern of the particular beat I was rapping on. The beautiful thing about rap is, the more you do it the more your flow improves. Over the years I've experimented with so many techniques that I probably utilize to this day but am not 100 percent conscious of. Another aspect that helped my flow evolve was my beat selection. I'm heavy on trying out new flows with beats that are out of my initial comfort zone.

 

What does rap do for you personally?

 

It helps me vent more than anything. To tell you the truth it puts me in my own realm so to speak. When I'm in "rap mode", it's like blacking out in a fight and beating the person within an inch of their life. In my case I'd be doing that to a beat [laughs], but to me that's what it is. I'm a fan of all sorts of music and the fact that I can throw on one of my songs gives me a good feeling. Sometimes I'll throw on something that I've done and just reminisce about the creative process of that particular record of mine. I'll even go as far as to analyze my flow. Rap is and has been my life for a very substantial amount of time. It's something I never gave up on, or took for granted. In all honesty it has me sitting here talk to you.

 

 

Why is this genre of music home for you?

 

I think that's because of who I was as a person and who I ultimately am now. Pre-rap I was shy, a bit withdrawn depending on who you talk to, but post-rap I'm confident, assertive if need be, outspoken with a "what you see is what you get attitude". No disrespect to any other genre of music, but in Hip Hop you don't walk around your problems, you walk through them. You don't get on a record and battle other artists in Country music or R&B, but in rap your reaction to any type of smart remark made about you would be in the form of a diss record. That's the mentally in this game. I think Hip Hop gave me a backbone; it slapped me up a bit, and made me look at the world in a different light. Hip Hop is home for me because I can always revert back to what brought me to the dance. No matter how mainstream I become, no one would ever have the balls to pull my card lyrically because I started out rapping from an "all you have is your skills" standpoint. My existence is because of Hip Hop without it there would no D'NME.

 

Your music is reminiscent of Eminem, do you hear that often and does his flow influence your craft?

 

Yeah, I do hear that, not as much as before but here and there people will draw comparisons. If they're saying it to me as a compliment, then it's cool because he was voted the "Best Rapper Alive" in that VIBE poll in 2008, so anyone with half a brain can see that me being compared to him is saying a lot. But if they're trying to typecast me as being an Eminem clone and what not here's how I diffuse that and make people with that perception look stupid.

 

When the founder of The Source's "Unsigned Hype" section Matteo Capoluongo heard the Notorious B.I.G's demo tape he said, "B.I.G reminded me of the second coming of Big Daddy Kane". Did B.I.G catch flack for being compared to Kane? Here's the thing, comparisons have been around since the beginning of time. If we're being completely honest, didn't Fabolous earlier on in his career sound like Mase?

 

If you really think about it, a large portion of the community in Hip Hop today have that "Swag" style, a lot of artists sound the same. So when you have someone like me come around who doesn't sound like everyone else and studied Eminem coming up, then they'll liken me to him. They said the same thing about Asher Roth and Hopsin, but for some reason no one thinks I sound like either of them. Theoretically If Asher Roth and Hopsin both sound like Eminem wouldn't I sound like them as well? But people don't seem to look at it like that. In regards to Eminem's flow influencing me, I would say I pulled from "The Marshall Mathers LP" and "The Eminem Show" moments of his career. I studied him, Big L and Jay-Z a lot. For me Eminem paved the way for an artist to come in and be aggressive without having to be from the streets. All in all from a technical aspect, he definitely influenced my style.

 

You choose lyrics over the flashy aspect of Hip Hop, why is being known for lyricism imperative?

 

That comes from me being taught differently. What I was taught was skills before anything else and that was embedded into me from the start. I didn't begin rapping because I saw a bunch of people doing it; I respected the culture, which in turn made me respect the craft. I came up paying close attention to people like Big L and Rakim who took their craft seriously. Rakim is an emcee who you know had to be sitting at a table formulating his rhymes for hours to have those kinds of complex schemes in his verses. I always try to uphold a standard lyrically because that is what I know. I spent years mastering my craft, and when you're that determined to be the best at rap you tend to disregard all the flashy things that are associated with Hip Hop.

 

It’s very obvious that you take your brand and image just as serious as your music. Who have you learned from or who do you model your movement after?

 

You know the funny thing is I never really modeled my movement after any artists, I'm not going to lie, I never miss anything 50 Cent does because when it comes to business his moves are very innovative, but as far as overall branding I’d like to credit my common sense. I always look at it like this, how people perceive you in this industry is what counts. I can't afford to shoot a music video in a bedroom with a handheld camera because my intentions are to fit in equally beside a person like 50 Cent or a person like Jay-Z, and the only way to do that is to make sure that I'm appearing in the correct fashion image and branding-wise. You won't appear larger than life if you're playing within the parameters of minuscule.

 

What has been the toughest challenge for you as you break into the music industry?

 

Not to sound arrogant but I wouldn't be able to pinpoint anything as challenging mainly because the toughest thing for me was to become polished as an artist, everything else is smaller now. Once I figured out how to create good music and uphold quality, it was all systems go. It's like the situation with my dad passing away when I was 6, that's the biggest and worst thing that could ever happen to me, everything else is child's play at this point. For me I would say I've learned valuable lessons along the way, such as watch any and everybody because there are people who are interested in strictly seeing themselves excel at your expense, but in terms of challenges? I love challenges, they keep my brain working.

 

What motivates your music? What sources do you draw from for inspiration?

 

A lot of things drive my music. People taking shots at me when they don't know what they're actually talking about, my life in general, people around me. All these things bleed into my music. When I wrote "The Stars" I wanted to touch on what was going through with people not understanding how much devotion I have to put forth to be successful in this industry. Then you have a record like "Can't Nobody Do It My Way" where I wanted to just rap and be that brash "take no shit" D'NME. The thought process and approach to every song is different. For example, I may be having a phone conversation with someone, and they'll say one phrase that catches my ear and I'll build a verse or a whole song from that one phrase. Or I may draw inspiration from something that happened to someone or I might just imagine a scenario and write about that. I like to have no limits when I'm writing. A lot of people around me will sometimes say "you should write about this subject", but that's not how my brain works, as weird as it sounds I don't think when I'm writing, I let things flow.

 

Which one of your songs best showcases your talent as a lyricist?

 

That's a bit difficult to say. I have a record on my "Guns & Roses" mixtape called "Against The Wall", that has a high level of lyricism, and it has a rapid flow. A lot of DJs liked that song. It was featured on various mixtapes. I would also throw "Can't Nobody Do It My Way" and "Out In The Morning" in the mix as well because they're both a great representation of me in a lyrical sense.

 

You’ve been heavy on the mixtape circuit, working with DJs such as DJ Smallz, DJ Green Lantern and DJ Whiteowl. How has this helped your grind as an artist?

 

Truthfully, It helped me go from being relatively unknown to having a buzz on the street and online. Mixtapes were and still are to a certain extent the entry level for Hip Hop if you're a true emcee. Because a lot of DJs don't endorse the mainstream stuff, so you get to show and prove your actual skills a bit more and you don't have to compromise your style because there are no limits as to what you can say on a mixtape.

 

Tell us about 9th Law Entertainment and what’s to come?

 

9th Law Entertainment is my label that was founded by myself, King Klutch who is another artist on the label, Roache and Flakes who play more of a behind the scenes role. The whole mentality behind 9th Law is "lead by demonstration and nothing else", so when you hear the music that's what I'm giving you. I don't have to print "I'm the best rapper" on a t-shirt or say it in an interview. I'd rather demonstrate that by letting the music speak for itself. Right now we're working intensely on building my buzz and then we'll start focusing all of our attention on King Klutch's project.

 

Where will D’NME be 2 years from now? What’s your vision?

 

In 2 years I see myself as either the biggest rapper out or closer to that space. I had to convince myself first that I was the best rapper before I could start making confident statements so I don't feel like I'm being cocky, or arrogant. I think you have to see yourself in great spaces and keep that playing in your mind in order for things to happen for you. No one believes a person who speaks without conviction, you have to be crazy enough to believe that your success in inevitable. In addition to that I obviously want to do stadium tours as well as find new talent and produce new artists when I decide to not rap as frequently as I am now. But for now my vision is to be the best rapper this world has to offer, bar none.

 

How do you plan to add to the climate of Hip-Hop?

 

I plan to do that by maintaining a certain quality. For me it's ludicrous to put out poorly thought out records just because distributing music at a fast pace is the thing to do right now. Notice how Justin Timberlake can take a hiatus and return without any resistance from the general public? That’s the type of thing I pay attention to. I won't allow myself to fade into oblivion because of something I'm in control of, which is quality. Everything I've built up to this point causes me to have a lot more to lose. So I have to make sure the quality remains high and the rhymes keep getting better, that's my focus.

 

Lastly, tell us how to stay connected and follow your movement.

 

Visit www.DNMEmusic.com, follow me on Twitter @_DNME, subscribe and check out the 9th Law channel on YouTube at www.youtube.com/9thlawENT.

 
 
Home  >  Next 2 Blow  >  Creeping with D'NME
Creeping with D'NME
Posted: Monday - January 28, 2013 | Comments: (0)
 

 It doesn’t take much to be influenced by the world of rap; you know the world where anybody who can rhyme or construct a catchy phrase gets radio play? Well, the world of Hip Hop requires much more…one must be fearless yet faithful to the culture, showing respect for those that have paved the way.

 

You’ll never meet an upcoming artist more equipped than D’NME.

 

D’NME is prepared to challenge your musical ear by bringing intellect back into the art of Hip Hop. There are no short cuts taken by this lyricist; he says more in a verse than some rappers say in an entire mixtape. If you want it straight with no chaser face D’NME. Outfitted with self-confidence that most would confuse as arrogance; D’NME is transparent with his gift of lyricism, no smoke and mirrors. He’s dedicated to his craft which has helped him mature into the man and artist he is today.

 

Yo! Raps steps into the land of D’NME. We learn where his very unique name came from, how rap has influenced his path and why he’s more interested in true talent than fame.

 

How did you come up with the name D’NME?

 

The name D'NME stemmed from the resistance I was receiving from various people in the earlier stages of my Hip Hop career. I always felt as if I was being written off before I even got a chance to show and prove. In addition to that, I never rapped about being a gangster, and 90% of the artists involved in Hip Hop no matter where you're from, put that "Gangster persona" in their subject matter. So I was constantly being ignored because of the way I was coming across, which was more backpack than street. So I remember being in the studio one day and saying to myself "If people want to hate me, then fuck it, I'll give them a reason to hate me. I'll be D'NME" (pronounced Dee-Enemy). Around that time I was listening to Jay-Z's "Reasonable Doubt" album, and one of my absolute favourite songs from that album is "D'Evils". So I took the "D" apostrophe and spelled "enemy" phonetically. It looked really cool on paper and what it represents in terms of origin gives it that "weight". So now, I have this attitude where if people say derogatory things about me, my response is "I'm D'NME you're not supposed to like me".

 

Explain your flow and how it grew to where it is today?

 

My flow was built on that whole multi-syllable technique. Rappers such as Kool G Rap, Big Daddy Kane, Rakim, Masta Ace, Big L, and Eminem among others, I'm cut from their cloth. I always strived to uphold a high-level of lyricism before anything else. I don't do ad-libs to fill in bars, I like to connect and bend words. I started out very complex, so when it came to rhyme schemes my flow was smooth but I was more focused on strictly rhyming and being as lyrical as possible, opposed to having deep meaning. Gradually I got into mixing multi-syllable schemes with "internal rhymes" and making certain parts of my flow mimic the drum pattern of the particular beat I was rapping on. The beautiful thing about rap is, the more you do it the more your flow improves. Over the years I've experimented with so many techniques that I probably utilize to this day but am not 100 percent conscious of. Another aspect that helped my flow evolve was my beat selection. I'm heavy on trying out new flows with beats that are out of my initial comfort zone.

 

What does rap do for you personally?

 

It helps me vent more than anything. To tell you the truth it puts me in my own realm so to speak. When I'm in "rap mode", it's like blacking out in a fight and beating the person within an inch of their life. In my case I'd be doing that to a beat [laughs], but to me that's what it is. I'm a fan of all sorts of music and the fact that I can throw on one of my songs gives me a good feeling. Sometimes I'll throw on something that I've done and just reminisce about the creative process of that particular record of mine. I'll even go as far as to analyze my flow. Rap is and has been my life for a very substantial amount of time. It's something I never gave up on, or took for granted. In all honesty it has me sitting here talk to you.

 

 

Why is this genre of music home for you?

 

I think that's because of who I was as a person and who I ultimately am now. Pre-rap I was shy, a bit withdrawn depending on who you talk to, but post-rap I'm confident, assertive if need be, outspoken with a "what you see is what you get attitude". No disrespect to any other genre of music, but in Hip Hop you don't walk around your problems, you walk through them. You don't get on a record and battle other artists in Country music or R&B, but in rap your reaction to any type of smart remark made about you would be in the form of a diss record. That's the mentally in this game. I think Hip Hop gave me a backbone; it slapped me up a bit, and made me look at the world in a different light. Hip Hop is home for me because I can always revert back to what brought me to the dance. No matter how mainstream I become, no one would ever have the balls to pull my card lyrically because I started out rapping from an "all you have is your skills" standpoint. My existence is because of Hip Hop without it there would no D'NME.

 

Your music is reminiscent of Eminem, do you hear that often and does his flow influence your craft?

 

Yeah, I do hear that, not as much as before but here and there people will draw comparisons. If they're saying it to me as a compliment, then it's cool because he was voted the "Best Rapper Alive" in that VIBE poll in 2008, so anyone with half a brain can see that me being compared to him is saying a lot. But if they're trying to typecast me as being an Eminem clone and what not here's how I diffuse that and make people with that perception look stupid.

 

When the founder of The Source's "Unsigned Hype" section Matteo Capoluongo heard the Notorious B.I.G's demo tape he said, "B.I.G reminded me of the second coming of Big Daddy Kane". Did B.I.G catch flack for being compared to Kane? Here's the thing, comparisons have been around since the beginning of time. If we're being completely honest, didn't Fabolous earlier on in his career sound like Mase?

 

If you really think about it, a large portion of the community in Hip Hop today have that "Swag" style, a lot of artists sound the same. So when you have someone like me come around who doesn't sound like everyone else and studied Eminem coming up, then they'll liken me to him. They said the same thing about Asher Roth and Hopsin, but for some reason no one thinks I sound like either of them. Theoretically If Asher Roth and Hopsin both sound like Eminem wouldn't I sound like them as well? But people don't seem to look at it like that. In regards to Eminem's flow influencing me, I would say I pulled from "The Marshall Mathers LP" and "The Eminem Show" moments of his career. I studied him, Big L and Jay-Z a lot. For me Eminem paved the way for an artist to come in and be aggressive without having to be from the streets. All in all from a technical aspect, he definitely influenced my style.

 

You choose lyrics over the flashy aspect of Hip Hop, why is being known for lyricism imperative?

 

That comes from me being taught differently. What I was taught was skills before anything else and that was embedded into me from the start. I didn't begin rapping because I saw a bunch of people doing it; I respected the culture, which in turn made me respect the craft. I came up paying close attention to people like Big L and Rakim who took their craft seriously. Rakim is an emcee who you know had to be sitting at a table formulating his rhymes for hours to have those kinds of complex schemes in his verses. I always try to uphold a standard lyrically because that is what I know. I spent years mastering my craft, and when you're that determined to be the best at rap you tend to disregard all the flashy things that are associated with Hip Hop.

 

It’s very obvious that you take your brand and image just as serious as your music. Who have you learned from or who do you model your movement after?

 

You know the funny thing is I never really modeled my movement after any artists, I'm not going to lie, I never miss anything 50 Cent does because when it comes to business his moves are very innovative, but as far as overall branding I’d like to credit my common sense. I always look at it like this, how people perceive you in this industry is what counts. I can't afford to shoot a music video in a bedroom with a handheld camera because my intentions are to fit in equally beside a person like 50 Cent or a person like Jay-Z, and the only way to do that is to make sure that I'm appearing in the correct fashion image and branding-wise. You won't appear larger than life if you're playing within the parameters of minuscule.

 

What has been the toughest challenge for you as you break into the music industry?

 

Not to sound arrogant but I wouldn't be able to pinpoint anything as challenging mainly because the toughest thing for me was to become polished as an artist, everything else is smaller now. Once I figured out how to create good music and uphold quality, it was all systems go. It's like the situation with my dad passing away when I was 6, that's the biggest and worst thing that could ever happen to me, everything else is child's play at this point. For me I would say I've learned valuable lessons along the way, such as watch any and everybody because there are people who are interested in strictly seeing themselves excel at your expense, but in terms of challenges? I love challenges, they keep my brain working.

 

What motivates your music? What sources do you draw from for inspiration?

 

A lot of things drive my music. People taking shots at me when they don't know what they're actually talking about, my life in general, people around me. All these things bleed into my music. When I wrote "The Stars" I wanted to touch on what was going through with people not understanding how much devotion I have to put forth to be successful in this industry. Then you have a record like "Can't Nobody Do It My Way" where I wanted to just rap and be that brash "take no shit" D'NME. The thought process and approach to every song is different. For example, I may be having a phone conversation with someone, and they'll say one phrase that catches my ear and I'll build a verse or a whole song from that one phrase. Or I may draw inspiration from something that happened to someone or I might just imagine a scenario and write about that. I like to have no limits when I'm writing. A lot of people around me will sometimes say "you should write about this subject", but that's not how my brain works, as weird as it sounds I don't think when I'm writing, I let things flow.

 

Which one of your songs best showcases your talent as a lyricist?

 

That's a bit difficult to say. I have a record on my "Guns & Roses" mixtape called "Against The Wall", that has a high level of lyricism, and it has a rapid flow. A lot of DJs liked that song. It was featured on various mixtapes. I would also throw "Can't Nobody Do It My Way" and "Out In The Morning" in the mix as well because they're both a great representation of me in a lyrical sense.

 

You’ve been heavy on the mixtape circuit, working with DJs such as DJ Smallz, DJ Green Lantern and DJ Whiteowl. How has this helped your grind as an artist?

 

Truthfully, It helped me go from being relatively unknown to having a buzz on the street and online. Mixtapes were and still are to a certain extent the entry level for Hip Hop if you're a true emcee. Because a lot of DJs don't endorse the mainstream stuff, so you get to show and prove your actual skills a bit more and you don't have to compromise your style because there are no limits as to what you can say on a mixtape.

 

Tell us about 9th Law Entertainment and what’s to come?

 

9th Law Entertainment is my label that was founded by myself, King Klutch who is another artist on the label, Roache and Flakes who play more of a behind the scenes role. The whole mentality behind 9th Law is "lead by demonstration and nothing else", so when you hear the music that's what I'm giving you. I don't have to print "I'm the best rapper" on a t-shirt or say it in an interview. I'd rather demonstrate that by letting the music speak for itself. Right now we're working intensely on building my buzz and then we'll start focusing all of our attention on King Klutch's project.

 

Where will D’NME be 2 years from now? What’s your vision?

 

In 2 years I see myself as either the biggest rapper out or closer to that space. I had to convince myself first that I was the best rapper before I could start making confident statements so I don't feel like I'm being cocky, or arrogant. I think you have to see yourself in great spaces and keep that playing in your mind in order for things to happen for you. No one believes a person who speaks without conviction, you have to be crazy enough to believe that your success in inevitable. In addition to that I obviously want to do stadium tours as well as find new talent and produce new artists when I decide to not rap as frequently as I am now. But for now my vision is to be the best rapper this world has to offer, bar none.

 

How do you plan to add to the climate of Hip-Hop?

 

I plan to do that by maintaining a certain quality. For me it's ludicrous to put out poorly thought out records just because distributing music at a fast pace is the thing to do right now. Notice how Justin Timberlake can take a hiatus and return without any resistance from the general public? That’s the type of thing I pay attention to. I won't allow myself to fade into oblivion because of something I'm in control of, which is quality. Everything I've built up to this point causes me to have a lot more to lose. So I have to make sure the quality remains high and the rhymes keep getting better, that's my focus.

 

Lastly, tell us how to stay connected and follow your movement.

 

Visit www.DNMEmusic.com, follow me on Twitter @_DNME, subscribe and check out the 9th Law channel on YouTube at www.youtube.com/9thlawENT.

 
 
   
 
   
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